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Amazon Japan was raided Thursday by business watchdog agency the Japan Fair Trade Commission on suspicions of anti-competitive practices.
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The yen held firm against the dollar on Tuesday as a political scandal engulfing Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's government raised doubts about his ability to continue to pursue his economic policies, including monetary easing.
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Thomson Reuters Corp is to track and analyze chatter about bitcoin on hundreds of news and social media websites to help investors looking for an edge in trading the world's biggest cryptocurrency, the company said on Monday.
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Greece will probably not need a precautionary credit line after its bailout ends in August if the country sticks to reforms, the head of Europe's rescue fund said in an interview released on Saturday.
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The Nasdaq blasted through a record high on Friday as traders looking to ride recent momentum piled into Microsoft, Netflix, Amazon.com and other high-performance technology names.
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U.S. filings for unemployment benefits rose by more than anticipated from a 48-year low while continuing to signal a tight job market, Labor Department figures showed Thursday.
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LONDON: The visit to the UK by the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed bin Salman, this week will set the stage for a new trading relationship between the two countries, Dr. Afnan AlShuaiby, head of the Arab-British Chamber of Commerce, predicted. Sitting in her Mayfair office, AlShuaiby told Arab News that with Brexit on the horizon and the Kingdom seeking to diversify its economy, “the sky is the limit” when it comes to business and trade partnerships.
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Want a toned ab, but it’s proving too difficult to achieve? You’re wondering how much you have to workout to get the desired result… here’s the answer you need.

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Investors sold shares in BMW (BMWG.DE) and Daimler (DAIGn.DE) on Monday after President Donald Trump said the U.S. may tax imports of European cars if the EU retaliates against his plan to impose tariffs on aluminium and steel.
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The European Union this month will unveil plans to tax large global tech companies' revenue at a rate in the 2-to-6-percent range, though more likely closer to 2 than to 6 percent, French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said in a newspaper interview.
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The U.S. dollar could face headwinds if President Donald Trump’s proposals to impose stiff tariffs on steel and aluminium imports are enacted, with the biggest risk stemming from the possible flight of capital flows needed to finance ballooning U.S. deficits.
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Rising inflation has put gold back on the radar for investors looking to protect themselves from emerging price pressures, but history suggests its reputation has been overstated.
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Amazon is in a deal to buy Ring, a marker of security cameras and internet-connected doorbells, But the companies didn't disclose details.
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Yet even with a plethora of risks and the volatility, a handful of virtual currencies continue to stand out thanks to their proprietary blockchain technology -- the digital, distributed, and decentralized ledger that's responsible for logging all transactions. While guessing the next move in virtual currencies has proved to be more of a crapshoot than Wall Street typically prefers, the following three cryptocurrencies may have a genuine shot at doubling from their current market caps.
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Bitcoin's dominance in the cryptocurrency space may be dwindling. After consistently comprising 74% to 96% of the aggregate crypto market cap between 2013 and March 2017, bitcoin's share of aggregate market cap has remained below 40% for nearly two months now. Meanwhile, other digital currencies, such as Ethereum and Ripple, have gained significant ground in terms of market cap.
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Rupert Murdoch's Twenty-First Century Fox has strengthened its offer to protect the independence of Sky's loss-making news channel to try to overcome regulatory concerns about Fox's takeover of the parent company.
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Income investors could be missing out if they don't own these dividend-friendly stocks.
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If you were planning on putting your money back into stocks, you might want to hold on.

That’s the message from Nader Naeimi of AMP Capital Investors Ltd. who’s still hanging on to the bulk of his cash reserves for another possible selloff by March.

After an initial sharp selloff, equity markets typically have a brief recovery before another bout of sustained selling, said Naeimi, AMP’s head of dynamic markets who helps oversee about $120 billion at the firm. After moving some 30 percent of his assets to cash last year, Naeimi is waiting for that second round to occur before jumping back
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in.
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Germany's statistics office has reported a renewed annual rise in the country's exports and imports. Europe's powerhouse managed to slightly narrow its trade surplus which has been in the firing line for many years.
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European stock-index futures signaled sharp losses for the region’s equity markets in a global selloff that has seen the Dow Jones Industrial Average suffering its worst point-plunge ever.
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All those stock market gains since US president Donald Trump signed a major tax overhaul in late December have vanished, after the Dow Industrial index posted its biggest one-day drop in history today (Feb. 5).

At one point, the Dow fell 6.3%, or nearly 1,600 points, which also cancelled its gains for this year, as investors fret over rising bond yields and the prospect of higher interest rates. It closed the day down 4.6%, or 1,175 points.
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The crypto credit card crackdown of 2018 is here.

Purchasing cryptocurrencies with a credit card is about to get significantly harder. Earlier today, the UK’s Lloyds Banking Group announced that it would prevent customers from purchasing cryptocurrencies with its credit cards.
Lloyds Banking Group is easily of the largest retail banks in the UK, and dominates a massive swathe of Britain’s retail banking market. In addition to the eponymous Lloyds Bank, it also owns Halifax, Bank of Scotland, and MBNA.

The ban solely relates to credit card transactions. Crypto purchases with Lloyds-issue
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d debit cards should continue to work as normal.
In a statement to The Guardian, Lloyds Banking Group said: “Across Lloyds Bank, Bank of Scotland, Halifax and MBNA, we do not accept credit card transactions involving the purchase of cryptocurrencies.”
Cryptocurrencies are unregulated, and the market for them is volatile and fundamentally speculative in nature. Over the past month, several major cryptocurrencies experienced major plunges in price.
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US President Donald Trump's protectionist trade policies could destabilise the world economyIn recent years, Asian trading partners, such as China, have seen a massive increase in their trade surplus with the US, which has been grappling with widespread deindustrialisation and manufacturing layoffs.

US President Donald Trump has taken up the issue and has promised to "bring jobs back to the US". In the first year of his presidency, he effectively commenced a trade war by imposing hefty tariffs on imports of foreign-made solar panels and washing machines, where China and South Korea have be
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en world leaders.
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Crypto investors are seeing red this week. Bitcoin plunged to two-month lows on Thursday, dipping below $9,000 for the first time since November. This week has seen coins across the board in the red — a sign that investors are jumping ship to fiat currencies this time instead of swapping into altcoins as we’ve seen in the recent past.
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China's biggest e-commerce company beat analysts' expectations as the firm shrugged off any concerns about a market slowdown.

The company also said it would buy a 33 percent stake in its payment affiliate Ant Financial in exchange for certain intellectual property rights owned by the ecommerce giant.

Revenue for the October-December period rose to 83.03 billion yuan ($13.19 billion), up from 53.25 billion yuan a year earlier.

That exceeded the 79.8 billion yuan average estimate of 28 analysts polled by Thomson Reuters.
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Zeven of eight indexes on our world watch list have posted gains through the first week of 2018. The top performer is Hong Kong's Hang Seng with a gain of 10.19%, followed by our own S&P 500 with a gain of 7.45%. In third is Bombay's BSE SENSEX with 6.62%. Coming in last is London's FTSE with a loss of 0.21%.

The chart below illustrates the comparative performance of World Markets since March 9, 2009. The start date is arbitrary: The S&P 500, CAC 40 and BSE SENSEX hit their lows on March 9th, the Nikkei 225 on March 10th, the DAXK on March 6th, the FTSE on March 3rd, the Shanghai Composite
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on November 4, 2008, and the Hang Seng even earlier on October 27, 2008. However, by aligning on the same day and using a log scale vertical axis, we get an excellent visualization of the relative performance. We've indexed each of the eight to 800 on the March 9th start date. The callout in the upper left corner shows the percent change from the start date to the latest weekly close.
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According to one valuation model that has a stellar long-term record, stocks are now more overvalued than they have been since 1969 — almost half a century ago.

The model to which I refer is based on a single number published each week in the famed Value Line Investment Survey, published by Value Line, Inc. The number represents the median of the projections made by Value Line’s analysts of where the 1,700 widely-followed stocks they closely monitor will be trading in three- to five years’ time. Followers refer to this number as the VLMAP, which stands for Value Line’s Median Appreciation P
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otential.
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Business sentiment towards the U.S. is more likely to be influenced by the administration’s stance on climate change and trade than by the recent tax cuts.
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Donald Trump has taken his battle with the media on to the global stage by using a speech in Davos declaring the US open for business to accuse his press and TV critics of being mean, vicious and purveyors of fake news.

Some members of the audience of business leaders, politicians, academics and media representatives at the World Economic Forum responded to the president’s renewed onslaught by hissing.