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The death of renowned physicist Stephen Hawking, reported today (March 14), prompted accolades from across NASA, including from its acting administrator and many astronauts.
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About 74,000 years ago, a large chunk of a Pacific island exploded. It sent ash and other debris around the world, including to the southern tip of Africa, where it would be found by a team of international scientists and entered as the latest data point in one of the hottest debates in paleoanthropology (I know):
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Doctors from Yale University used bacteria-killing viruses collected from a Connecticut pond to successfully treat a man with a bacterial infection.
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Neutron stars aren’t the twinkle-twinkle kind you typically see in the night sky. They’re stellar corpses, and incredibly dense sources of gravity, with perhaps 1.5 times the mass of the sun packed into an area less than a dozen miles across. Around 9,000 light years away from Earth, one neutron stars seems to have befriended a red dwarf. And scientists observed the new relationship beginning in a flash of energy.
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A popular YouTube channel is trying to convince viewers that photos of an avalanche on an island near Antarctica depict an alien spaceship crash site.
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Birdwatchers are rushing to a town in Alabama in hopes of glimpsing a one-in-a-million look at a yellow Northern cardinal, after a local resident posted images to social media of the bird.
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A new species of shark, the Atlantic sixgill, has been discovered in Belize, the Gulf of Mexico and the Bahamas.
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After 12 years of experimental effort, a team of scientists, led by ASU School of Earth and Space Exploration astronomer Judd Bowman, has detected the fingerprints of the earliest stars in the universe. Using radio signals, the detection provides the first evidence for the oldest ancestors in our cosmic family tree, born by a mere 180 million years after the universe began.
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The world's newest species of water bear has eight legs and eggs covered with tentacles. And it was discovered in a parking lot.
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There’s a planet just over 4 light-years away orbiting a star at just the right distance—not too close, not too far—that it could support liquid water on its surface. We don’t know much about its atmosphere, if it even has one, and we’re trying to figure out more about its interior. There’s a lot more to uncover, but it sure sounds like it could be a promising place to find some alien neighbors, right?

If only we could figure out how to deal with the massive stellar flares.

A study published this week in The Astrophysical Journal Letters found that instead of a nice warm ring of dust aro
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und the star—which could indicate a cozy nursery of planets, as a study last fall reported—there was actually a huge stellar flare. (That’s the same as a solar flare, but on a star other than our own Sun).
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NASA’s InSight probe, due for a May launch, should cut to the heart of what lurks in the Red planet’s deep interior. In the process, the mission should give planetary scientists a better handle on rocky planet formation and evolution everywhere.
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The Andromeda galaxy is much less massive than previously thought, which means the collision between our galaxy and Andromeda could end in a tie.
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A time-lapse video shows an orange streak of light from a Super Blue Moon rising behind a windmill in Sesimbra, Portugal.
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The expansion of the Universe only significantly affects space and time on scales bigger even than entire clusters of galaxies.
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A new analysis of data from two lunar missions finds evidence that the Moon's water is widely distributed across the surface and is not confined to a particular region or type of terrain. The water appears to be present day and night, though it's not necessarily easily accessible.
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Researchers think they've identified some key ways the brains of superagers are different than the brains of those who experience normal or accelerated cognitive decline.
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Even with all the photos that have been taken of space, there are still new things to be seen.
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A collision with an object in its home system most likely sent 'Oumuamua, the solar system's first known visitor from another planetary system, into an out-of-control spin that will last for billions of years.
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Thermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. These are sufficient to convert a temperature difference into electricity via the thermoelectric effect, which has now been demonstrated by a team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin.
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DNA analysis is giving clues to how the vampire bat can survive on blood alone.

The bat can drink up to half its weight in blood a day unlike other relatives, which dine on fruit, nectar or insects.

Blood is low in nutrients and can harbour deadly viruses.

Vampire bats have key differences in genes involved in immunity and food metabolism compared with other bats.

The researchers say the bat's gut microbes are also distinct.

They found evidence of more than 280 types of bacteria in the bat's droppings that would have made most other mammals unwell.
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The largest black holes grow faster than their galaxies, according to new research.

Two studies from separate groups of researchers find that so-called supermassive black holes are bigger than astronomers would have calculated from their surroundings alone. Supermassive black holes are enormous gravity wells found in the center of large galaxies.
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The war goes on. In a series of deadly raids day and night, the African Matabele ant sets out from its bunkered nests to hunt its prey: phalanxes of termite soldiers, assembled in number at feeding sites.
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A new technique for measuring the mass of galaxies has been applied to our closest galactic neighbour - and it has found that the Andromeda galaxy is roughly the same size as the Milky Way, and not two to three times bigger as was previously thought.

This means, when the two galaxies merge in about 4 billion years' time, the Milky Way won't be fully consumed by the Andromeda galaxy as previous models suggested.

Led by astrophysicist Prajwal Kafle from the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, the team found that the mass of the Andromeda galaxy is around 800 billion times th
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e mass of the Sun, a measurement also known as a solar mass.
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An Iranian military advisor recently claimed that lizards could attract radioactivity and detect uranium mines, but that claim makes no sense, experts said.
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Scientists have noticed a reduced incidence of cancer in patients suffering from the hereditary neurodegenerative condition Huntington’s disease. Now a team has uncovered how the disease could also be killing cancer cells, and how this could be harnessed for a new cancer treatment.
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NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is making history again, this time one-upping the legendary Voyager 1.

New Horizons is the probe that flew by Pluto on July 14, 2015, and beamed back those amazing pictures. Now, it's zipping along at more than 700,000 miles (1.1 million kilometers) each day -- moving farther and farther out into our solar system.
On December 5, 2017, it broke a record set by Voyager 1 in 1990.
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Almost exactly five years ago, a truck-size celestial rockunexpectedly exploded in the atmosphere above Chelyabinsk, Russia, on Feb. 15, 2013. As town officials dealt with broken glass and hundreds injured, people worldwide asked why nobody spotted the 51-foot-across (17 meters) object sooner, in time to warn residents.

The same question could be asked of another asteroid that will whiz harmlessly past the Earth today (Feb. 9). NASA said this object, nicknamed 2018 CB, may very well be bigger than one that broke up over Chelyabinsk. The asteroid was only spotted on Sunday (Feb. 4) by the Ca
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talina Sky Survey. Early estimates of 2018 CB's size range between 50 and 130 feet (15 and 40 m) in diameter. The object will fly by Earth at about 5:30 p.m. EST (2:30 p.m. PST) at less than 20 percent of the distance from the Earth to the moon. That's about 238,855 miles (384,400 km) from us.
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Toads might want to be careful what meal they catch with their sticky, pink tongues. It could be a toxic beetle that makes them throw up … and then scurries away to tell the tale, a new study from Japan finds.
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Some physicists have proposed that maybe the universe has one or more extra dimensions that show up on very large scales, making the universe accelerate. In these theories, light and matter are confined to the four dimensions we know, but gravity “leaks” into the other dimensions. As a result, gravity gets a little weaker the farther out in space we look, but light shouldn’t be affected by the extra dimensions.