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Things are officially getting exciting. New science has just come in from the collaboration to photograph Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way, and it's ponying up the secrets at our galaxy's dusty heart. The image below is the best picture yet of Sgr A* (don't worry, there's more to come from the Event Horizon Telescope), and while it may look like just a weird blob of light to you, astrophysicists studying the radio data can learn a lot from what they're looking at - and they think they've identified a relativistic jet angled towards Earth. Because the image taken of the region is the highest resolution yet - twice as high as the previous best - the researchers were able to precisely map the properties of the light around the black hole as scattered by the cloud. "The galactic centre is full of matter around the black hole, which acts like frosted glass that we have to look through," astrophysicist Eduardo Ros of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Germany told New Scientist. Using very long baseline interferometry to take observations at a wavelength of 3.5 millimetres (86 GHz frequency), a team of astronomers has used computer modelling to simulate what's inside the thick cloud of plasma, dust and gas surrounding the black hole.


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